When I took the device to Mongolia, it was mostly for the purpose of documenting my trip and sharing what it’s like to be paleontologist." Watanabe says. "And the reception the videos have received has been overwhelmingly positive. People seemed to have really loved the first-person view. You can always watch a documentary from National Geographic, but this actually feels like you’re out there in the Gobi Desert, searching for fossils across this vast landscape.
Tech entrepreneurs, long obsessed with making apps to help you find a relationship, have now begun trying to solve the problem of staying happy in one,” wrote Ann Friedman on The Cut, a blog of New York magazine. Ms. Friedman points to apps like Avocado, Couple and Between as smartphone apps that “keep you close with your partner through the power of a smartphone alone.
theatlantic
theatlantic:

What You Learn About Tech from Watching All 456 Law & Order Episodes

Sometime soon after Netflix’s streaming service launched, Jeff Thompson found himself watching episode after episode of Law & Order. It was so easy. An episode would end and he’d click “next.” We’ve all been there. You can watch a lot of Law & Order that way.
But Thompson’s approach was different than your average binge-TV viewer’s. Thompson brought a archivist’s flair to his hours watching. As he’d go, he’d screenshot “oddities”: scenes taken from a first-person perspective, or those portrayed in an unusual split-screen fashion.
After a bit, most of the oddities melted away and just one thing—one single thing—kept popping out of the frame to grab Thompson’s attention: computers. There’s a computer. There’s another. And there’s another. He kept screenshotting them. “It didn’t take long,” Thompson wrote to me, “to realize this should be extended to an exhaustive project.”
So in 2012 Thompson applied for, and received, a commission from Rhizome, an organization in New York City that supports work at the intersection of arts and technology.
And that’s when his work really began.

theatlantic:

What You Learn About Tech from Watching All 456 Law & Order Episodes

Sometime soon after Netflix’s streaming service launched, Jeff Thompson found himself watching episode after episode of Law & Order. It was so easy. An episode would end and he’d click “next.” We’ve all been there. You can watch a lot of Law & Order that way.

But Thompson’s approach was different than your average binge-TV viewer’s. Thompson brought a archivist’s flair to his hours watching. As he’d go, he’d screenshot “oddities”: scenes taken from a first-person perspective, or those portrayed in an unusual split-screen fashion.

After a bit, most of the oddities melted away and just one thing—one single thing—kept popping out of the frame to grab Thompson’s attention: computers. There’s a computer. There’s another. And there’s another. He kept screenshotting them. “It didn’t take long,” Thompson wrote to me, “to realize this should be extended to an exhaustive project.”

So in 2012 Thompson applied for, and received, a commission from Rhizome, an organization in New York City that supports work at the intersection of arts and technology.

And that’s when his work really began.